Book Haul

The time has come for another book haul, it’s been a while since I’ve done this but I thought it was about time to add to my TBR (to be read) pile…

So here goes…

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The 86 Fix by Keith A. Pearson 

Imagine if you could travel back in time and relive one weekend as your teenage self — would you change anything?

On the way home from school in 1986, Craig Pelling decided to buy a can of Coke. He wasn’t to know a seemingly innocuous visit to the local newsagent would dramatically change the course of his life. Consequently, Craig now lives in a loveless marriage and earns a living in a dead-end job as the manager of an electrical store. He could have been so much more. He could have achieved so much more.

But fate hasn’t finished with Craig Pelling.

A school reunion proves to be the catalyst for chaos, and decades on from his visit to that newsagent, Craig’s mundane life is turned upside down as his past comes back to haunt him. As he plummets towards rock-bottom, all seems lost for Craig until he’s thrown a lifeline — the miraculous lifeline of a brief trip back in time to 1986. Will he be able to fix his life? Is it as simple as just reverting one decision he made over thirty years ago?

Craig is about to find out.


Beyond Broadhall: The 86 Fix Book 2 by Keith A. Pearson

After his miraculous weekend in 1986, Craig Pelling returned to a future he could never have envisaged. Even by his own hapless standards, his plans have spectacularly backfired.

Everything he tried to fix is now broken, and a bleak, lonely existence is all Craig has to look forward to. Does he face that future, or does he try to seek answers? Either way, an emotional rollercoaster ride beckons.

Can Craig can find closure before it ends? Or does fate have a few more twists in store for him, beyond Broadhall?


The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan 

Richard Hannay finds a corpse in his flat and becomes involved in a plot by spies to precipitate war and subvert British naval power.

The resourceful victim of a manhunt, he is pursued by both the police and the ruthless conspirators.


The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

The night Cameron Post’s parents died, her first emotion was relief. Relief they would never know that hours earlier, she’d been kissing a girl. 

Now living with her conservative aunt in small-town Montana, hiding her sexuality and blending in becomes second nature to Cameron until she begins an intense friendship with the beautiful Coley Taylor.

Desperate to ‘correct’ her niece, Cameron’s aunt takes drastic action. 

Now Cameron must battle with the coast of being her true self – even if she’s not completely sure who that is. 


The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jews who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia. In that terrible place, Lale was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival—literally scratching numbers into his fellow victims’ arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Lale used the infinitesimal freedom of movement that this position awarded him to exchange jewels and money taken from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he had been caught, he would have been killed; many owed him their survival.

There have been many books about the Holocaust—and there will be many more. What makes this one so memorable is Lale Sokolov’s incredible zest for life. He understood exactly what was in store for him and his fellow prisoners, and he was determined to survive—not just to survive but to leave the camp with his dignity and integrity intact, to live his life to the full. Terrible though this story is, it is also a story of hope and of courage. It is also—almost unbelievably—a love story. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale—a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer—it was love at first sight, and he determined not only to survive himself but to ensure that Gita did, too. His story—their story—will make you weep, but you will also find it uplifting. It shows the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.

Like many survivors, Lale and Gita told few people their story after the war. They eventually made their way to Australia, where they raised a son and had a successful life. But when Gita died, Lale felt he could no longer carry the burden of their past alone. He chose to tell his story.


I can’t wait to read these! Keep your eyes peeled for reviews coming up very soon!

What’s on your to be read pile at the moment? Let me know in the comments below!

Lucy xox

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